JAMES G. VICKARYOUS

Jim Vickaryous

Jim Vickaryous is a civil trial lawyer and the managing partner at the Vickaryous Law Firm in Seminole County, Florida. He is a member of the Florida Bar Board of Governors, representing 2,200 lawyers in Seminole and Brevard Counties (Florida’s 18th Judicial Circuit).

Jim attended the University of Miami as an undergraduate on a full U.S. Army ROTC scholarship. He also attended Florida’s premier courtroom advocacy training institution, Stetson University College of Law, receiving both his Juris Doctor and MBA degrees. Jim is recognized as having the highest jury verdict in Seminole County, Florida for a head injury causing a debilitating migraine.

Jim is a proud veteran of the U.S. Army Reserve, having received the NATO Medal for Service in the former Yugoslavia and the prestigious U.S. Army Meritorious Service Medal. He is also a past president of both the Seminole County Bar Association and the Central Florida Trial Lawyers Association.

Managing Partner

Jim’s latest articles

BE A KIND LAWYER - Sep 12, 2022 By Jim Vickaryous.

My grandmother used to say: “Kill ‘em with Kindness, Jimmy!” As a child, my grandmother’s wise advice often went in one ear and out the other, but this stuck with me. Being kind is also the best advice for lawyers. Kindness extended by a lawyer is often a surprise to a non-lawyer. They often think of us as professional killjoys. As a veteran lawyer, seeing lawyers exchange even the smallest of kind acts greatly encourages me. The kindness I most appreciate is the kindness shown that will not necessarily gain the giver anything.

In recent years, I had the great honor to be admitted into the Bar of the United States Supreme Court. One of the perks of being a new member is getting a front row seat to that day’s oral arguments. The case being argued that day had to do with whether the Veterans Administration had given due process to a particular veteran. I was seated immediately behind the young lawyer representing the veteran. As we waited for the Supreme Court justices to come in, I watched the wide-eyed lawyer reading through his materials. Hidden just below the counsel table was his trembling hand. He had a terrified look on his face. Perhaps I would be trembling too if I was about to argue before the nine justices of the United States Supreme Court and your opposing party is the United States of America.

A moment later, the United States Solicitor General and his team of lawyers walked into the courtroom. The Solicitor General looked the picture of confidence. He was trim, smiling, and wearing a morning coat, the traditional uniform of the Solicitor General. Many people were shaking his hand as he walked into the courtroom. He came across as a rockstar in the legal world. After arranging his briefing notes at his counsel table, the Solicitor General walked the five steps past the podium and greeted the nervous young lawyer. The Solicitor General shook his hand, welcomed him to the court, and wished him well. The Solicitor General showed kindness and respect to the young lawyer in a manner that made him feel welcome. The young lawyer sat down again to wait for the moment that the Supreme Court would be called into session, and he would be invited to begin arguing for his client. I looked at his hand as the justices filed in. It had stopped shaking. He looked confident. He did a great job advocating for his client. Based upon the commentary in the courtroom after the arguments had finished, he had clearly won over the audience and, perhaps, maybe even five justices to his client’s prayer. The Solicitor General’s small act of kindness calmed his opposing counsel in his moment of anxiety.

After arguments were over the court went into recess. Since I was in the front row, I stayed for a few moments to take in the atmosphere of the courtroom. I looked up and watched Justice Ruth Bader Ginsberg slowly moving out of her chair and taking her first step down the staircase. She started to fall. A robed arm reached up gracefully to steady her. The robed arm quickly and gentlemanly helped her down the steps. I looked over and saw that the kind robed arm belonged to Justice Clarence Thomas.

You don’t have to go to the United States Supreme Court to see everyday acts of lawyers being kind. I’ve observed it taking place often among lawyers across Florida. There’s a big upside to being kind. The mantra of “Kill ’em with Kindness” helps greatly when you have the urge to tell someone what you really think in a moment of irritation. Being kind is fundamental to civility. In fact, the Oath of Admission for The Florida Bar makes it a requirement of every lawyer: “To opposing parties and their counsel, I pledge fairness, integrity, and civility not only in court, but also in all written and oral communications.” Be purposeful in representing your clients, but always be a kind lawyer.

Jim Vickaryous is the managing partner of the Vickaryous Law Firm in Lake Mary and represents the 18th Circuit on The Florida Bar Board of Governors.

Published by The Florida Bar.

BE A 50-YEAR LAWYER - Aug 11, 2022 By Jim Vickaryous.

When you reach 50 years as a Bar member, The Florida Bar gives you a free lunch at the Annual Convention. I was at this year’s annual convention, wanted to get some lunch, and wandered into the event honoring the 300 recent 50-year members of the Bar. They in good nature outed me as not being a 50-year member of the Bar and charged me for lunch.

I picked the right place to make some new friends, and learned a thing or two from that room full of 50-year lawyers. I was impressed with how many had taken the Bar up on the offer of a free lunch. Every one of the lawyers that I spoke to were proud to be lawyers. Many had generations of their family eating lunch with them in honor of their longtime service and commitment to the practice of law.

There was a common theme about which they were happy. Each 50-year lawyer I spoke to was most proud of helping people for half a century. I was struck by this, as all the lawyers present practiced in many different areas of the law. Over and over, they told me they simply enjoyed helping others. Perhaps the secret to making it to the 50-year watermark (and getting a free lunch from The Florida Bar), is keeping a place in your heart for helping people.

Whether you are closing in on 50-years of practicing law, or you just got sworn in and took the Oath of Attorney (or at the midway mark like me), helping people should be our goal as lawyers. Being of service to others makes us all feel significant and adds purpose to our lives. It also keeps us gainfully employed. Clients want a lawyer that truly cares and wants to help them. Clients also want lawyers that take pride in what they do, work hard at keeping their competitive edge, and don’t lose sight of why they became lawyers.

It was nice to eat lunch with 50-year lawyers that have the same heart to help people as when they started five decades ago. In addition to lunch, the Bar gives a 50-year lapel pin to mark the occasion. I saw each pin being worn proudly on many lapels. After a lifetime of service, these lawyers were very proud of what they had achieved throughout their careers. Many spoke to me about the people that they had helped and whose lives they made better.

We should all be so fortunate to have such rewarding careers helping people. I thanked them all for setting a great example of how to be a lawyer. Remember, we can all be 50-year lawyers. Practicing law is not a sprint, but a marathon. It is not the age, not the years of experience, it’s what’s in your heart. Let us all resolve to be 50-year lawyers in our heart, no matter our years.

Jim Vickaryous is the managing partner of the Vickaryous Law Firm in Lake Mary and represents the 18th Circuit on The Florida Bar Board of Governors. 

Published by The Florida Bar.